Kristin Poole O'Grady, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

kristin.p.ogrady@vanderbilt.edu
Faculty Appointments
Assistant Professor of Radiology & Radiological Sciences Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Education
Ph.D., Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TennesseeB.S., Engineering Science, Trinity University, San Antonio, Texas
Office Address
AA1105 MCN (2310)
Research Description
Kristin O’Grady, PhD, is a biomedical engineer, imaging scientist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). She earned her BS in Engineering Science at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX and her PhD in Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University. Dr. O’Grady completed her postdoctoral training in the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS) under the mentorship of Seth Smith, PhD. She was awarded an NRSA F32 postdoctoral fellowship by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (2017-2018) to develop chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI methods to study cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. She joined the Vanderbilt faculty in 2019 as Research Instructor. Dr. O’Grady was promoted to Research Assistant Professor and was awarded a four-year K01 Mentored Research Scientist Career Development grant from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in 2020. Her research is focused on developing quantitative MR methodologies for the brain and spinal cord, with the goal of better understanding the effects of biological sex on pathological changes associated with neurological diseases such as multiple sclerosis.

Section: Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science

VUMC email: kristin.p.ogrady@vumc.org
Publications
Schilling KG, Fadnavis S, Batson J, Visagie M, Combes AJE, By S, McKnight CD, Bagnato F, Garyfallidis E, Landman BA, Smith SA, O'Grady KP. Denoising of diffusion MRI in the cervical spinal cord - effects of denoising strategy and acquisition on intra-cord contrast, signal modeling, and feature conspicuity. Neuroimage [print-electronic]. 2023 Feb 2/1/2023; 266: 119826. PMID: 36543265, PMCID: PMC9843739, PII: S1053-8119(22)00947-8, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2022.119826, ISSN: 1095-9572.

Schilling KG, Palombo M, O'Grady KP, Combes AJE, Anderson AW, Landman BA, Smith SA. Minimal number of sampling directions for robust measures of the spherical mean diffusion weighted signal: Effects of sampling directions, b-value, signal-to-noise ratio, hardware, and fitting strategy. Magn Reson Imaging [print-electronic]. 2022 Dec; 94: 25-35. PMID: 35931321, PMCID: PMC9904413, PII: S0730-725X(22)00133-3, DOI: 10.1016/j.mri.2022.07.015, ISSN: 1873-5894.

Bosworth AM, Kim H, O'Grady KP, Richter I, Lee L, O'Grady BJ, Lippmann ES. Influence of Substrate Stiffness on Barrier Function in an iPSC-Derived In Vitro Blood-Brain Barrier Model. Cell Mol Bioeng. 2022 Feb; 15(1): 31-42. PMID: 35096185, PMCID: PMC8761195, PII: 706, DOI: 10.1007/s12195-021-00706-8, ISSN: 1865-5025.

O'Grady KP, Satish S, Owen QR, Box BA, Bagnato F, Combes AJE, Cook SR, Westervelt HJ, Feiler HR, Lawless RD, Sarma A, Malone SD, Ndolo JM, Yoon K, Dortch RD, Rogers BP, Smith SA. Relaxation-Compensated Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer MRI in the Brain at 7T: Application in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis. Front Neurol. 2022; 13: 764690. PMID: 35299614, PMCID: PMC8923037, DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2022.764690, ISSN: 1664-2295.

Combes AJE, O'Grady KP, Rogers BP, Schilling KG, Lawless RD, Visagie M, Houston D, Prock L, Malone S, Satish S, Witt AA, McKnight CD, Bagnato F, Gore JC, Smith SA. Functional connectivity in the dorsal network of the cervical spinal cord is correlated with diffusion tensor imaging indices in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Neuroimage Clin [print-electronic]. 2022; 35: 103127. PMID: 35917721, PMCID: PMC9421501, PII: S2213-1582(22)00192-9, DOI: 10.1016/j.nicl.2022.103127, ISSN: 2213-1582.

Combes AJE, Clarke MA, O'Grady KP, Schilling KG, Smith SA. Advanced spinal cord MRI in multiple sclerosis: Current techniques and future directions. Neuroimage Clin [print-electronic]. 2022; 36: 103244. PMID: 36306717, PMCID: PMC9668663, PII: S2213-1582(22)00309-6, DOI: 10.1016/j.nicl.2022.103244, ISSN: 2213-1582.

Cohen-Adad J, Alonso-Ortiz E, Abramovic M, Arneitz C, Atcheson N, Barlow L, Barry RL, Barth M, Battiston M, Büchel C, Budde M, Callot V, Combes AJE, De Leener B, Descoteaux M, de Sousa PL, Dostál M, Doyon J, Dvorak A, Eippert F, Epperson KR, Epperson KS, Freund P, Finsterbusch J, Foias A, Fratini M, Fukunaga I, Wheeler-Kingshott CAMG, Germani G, Gilbert G, Giove F, Gros C, Grussu F, Hagiwara A, Henry PG, Horák T, Hori M, Joers J, Kamiya K, Karbasforoushan H, Kerkovský M, Khatibi A, Kim JW, Kinany N, Kitzler H, Kolind S, Kong Y, Kudlicka P, Kuntke P, Kurniawan ND, Kusmia S, Labounek R, Laganà MM, Laule C, Law CS, Lenglet C, Leutritz T, Liu Y, Llufriu S, Mackey S, Martinez-Heras E, Mattera L, Nestrasil I, O'Grady KP, Papinutto N, Papp D, Pareto D, Parrish TB, Pichiecchio A, Prados F, Rovira À, Ruitenberg MJ, Samson RS, Savini G, Seif M, Seifert AC, Smith AK, Smith SA, Smith ZA, Solana E, Suzuki Y, Tackley G, Tinnermann A, Valošek J, Van De Ville D, Yiannakas MC, Weber KA, Weiskopf N, Wise RG, Wyss PO, Xu J. Generic acquisition protocol for quantitative MRI of the spinal cord. Nat Protoc [print-electronic]. 2021 Oct; 16(10): 4611-32. PMID: 34400839, PMCID: PMC8811488, PII: 10.1038/s41596-021-00588-0, DOI: 10.1038/s41596-021-00588-0, ISSN: 1750-2799.

Cohen-Adad J, Alonso-Ortiz E, Abramovic M, Arneitz C, Atcheson N, Barlow L, Barry RL, Barth M, Battiston M, Büchel C, Budde M, Callot V, Combes AJE, De Leener B, Descoteaux M, de Sousa PL, Dostál M, Doyon J, Dvorak A, Eippert F, Epperson KR, Epperson KS, Freund P, Finsterbusch J, Foias A, Fratini M, Fukunaga I, Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott CAM, Germani G, Gilbert G, Giove F, Gros C, Grussu F, Hagiwara A, Henry PG, Horák T, Hori M, Joers J, Kamiya K, Karbasforoushan H, Kerkovský M, Khatibi A, Kim JW, Kinany N, Kitzler HH, Kolind S, Kong Y, Kudlicka P, Kuntke P, Kurniawan ND, Kusmia S, Labounek R, Laganà MM, Laule C, Law CS, Lenglet C, Leutritz T, Liu Y, Llufriu S, Mackey S, Martinez-Heras E, Mattera L, Nestrasil I, O'Grady KP, Papinutto N, Papp D, Pareto D, Parrish TB, Pichiecchio A, Prados F, Rovira À, Ruitenberg MJ, Samson RS, Savini G, Seif M, Seifert AC, Smith AK, Smith SA, Smith ZA, Solana E, Suzuki Y, Tackley G, Tinnermann A, Valošek J, Van De Ville D, Yiannakas MC, Weber Ii KA, Weiskopf N, Wise RG, Wyss PO, Xu J. Open-access quantitative MRI data of the spinal cord and reproducibility across participants, sites and manufacturers. Sci Data. 2021 Aug 8/16/2021; 8(1): 219. PMID: 34400655, PMCID: PMC8368310, PII: 10.1038/s41597-021-00941-8, DOI: 10.1038/s41597-021-00941-8, ISSN: 2052-4463.

McKeithan LJ, Lyttle BD, Box BA, O'Grady KP, Dortch RD, Conrad BN, Thompson LM, Rogers BP, Newhouse P, Pawate S, Bagnato F, Smith SA. 7T quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) of cortical gray matter in multiple sclerosis correlates with cognitive impairment. Neuroimage [print-electronic]. 2019 Dec; 203: 116190. PMID: 31525497, PII: S1053-8119(19)30781-5, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116190, ISSN: 1095-9572.

Schilling KG, By S, Feiler HR, Box BA, O'Grady KP, Witt A, Landman BA, Smith SA. Diffusion MRI microstructural models in the cervical spinal cord - Application, normative values, and correlations with histological analysis. Neuroimage [print-electronic]. 2019 Nov 11/1/2019; 201: 116026. PMID: 31326569, PMCID: PMC6765439, PII: S1053-8119(19)30607-X, DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116026, ISSN: 1095-9572.

O'Grady KP, Dula AN, Lyttle BD, Thompson LM, Conrad BN, Box BA, McKeithan LJ, Pawate S, Bagnato F, Landman BA, Newhouse P, Smith SA. Glutamate-sensitive imaging and evaluation of cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis. Mult. Scler [print-electronic]. 2018 Sep 9/19/2018; 1352458518799583. PMID: 30230400, DOI: 10.1177/1352458518799583, ISSN: 1477-0970.

O'Grady KP, Kavanaugh TE, Cho H, Ye H, Gupta MK, Madonna MC, Lee J, O'Brien CM, Skala MC, Hasty KA, Duvall CL. Drug-Free ROS Sponge Polymeric Microspheres Reduce Tissue Damage from Ischemic and Mechanical Injury. ACS Biomater Sci Eng [print-electronic]. 2018 Apr 4/9/2018; 4(4): 1251-64. PMID: 30349873, PMCID: PMC6195321, DOI: 10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00804, ISSN: 2373-9878.

Poole KM, Nelson CE, Joshi RV, Martin JR, Gupta MK, Haws SC, Kavanaugh TE, Skala MC, Duvall CL. ROS-responsive microspheres for on demand antioxidant therapy in a model of diabetic peripheral arterial disease. Biomaterials [print-electronic]. 2015 Feb; 41: 166-75. PMID: 25522975, PMCID: PMC4274772, PII: S0142-9612(14)01176-4, DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2014.11.016, ISSN: 1878-5905.

Poole KM, McCormack DR, Patil CA, Duvall CL, Skala MC. Quantifying the vascular response to ischemia with speckle variance optical coherence tomography. Biomed Opt Express. 2014 Dec 12/1/2014; 5(12): 4118-30. PMID: 25574425, PMCID: PMC4285592, PII: 4118, DOI: 10.1364/BOE.5.004118, ISSN: 2156-7085.

Poole KM, Tucker-Schwartz JM, Sit WW, Walsh AJ, Duvall CL, Skala MC. Quantitative optical imaging of vascular response in vivo in a model of peripheral arterial disease. Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol [print-electronic]. 2013 Oct 10/15/2013; 305(8): H1168-80. PMID: 23955718, PMCID: PMC3798791, PII: ajpheart.00362.2013, DOI: 10.1152/ajpheart.00362.2013, ISSN: 1522-1539.

Joshi RV, Nelson CE, Poole KM, Skala MC, Duvall CL. Dual pH- and temperature-responsive microparticles for protein delivery to ischemic tissues. Acta Biomater [print-electronic]. 2013 May; 9(5): 6526-34. PMID: 23402764, PMCID: PMC3702271, PII: S1742-7061(13)00059-7, DOI: 10.1016/j.actbio.2013.01.041, ISSN: 1878-7568.

Walsh AJ, Poole KM, Duvall CL, Skala MC. Ex vivo optical metabolic measurements from cultured tissue reflect in vivo tissue status. J Biomed Opt. 2012 Nov; 17(11): 116015. PMID: 23117810, PMCID: PMC3484268, PII: 1388600, DOI: 10.1117/1.JBO.17.11.116015, ISSN: 1560-2281.

Burra S, Nicolella DP, Francis WL, Freitas CJ, Mueschke NJ, Poole K, Jiang JX. Dendritic processes of osteocytes are mechanotransducers that induce the opening of hemichannels. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A [print-electronic]. 2010 Aug 8/3/2010; 107(31): 13648-53. PMID: 20643964, PMCID: PMC2922284, PII: 1009382107, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1009382107, ISSN: 1091-6490.

Available Postdoctoral Position Details
Posted: 7/22/2021

The Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science (VUIIS) is seeking a postdoctoral research fellow for a 2-year mentored research training opportunity supported by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering. Faculty interests and resources are illustrated at vuiis.vumc.org, and we are currently seeking a candidate with an interest in developing and applying quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods at 3T and 7T field strengths for clinical applications in neurology.

Ongoing projects of immediate interest include:

• Development of structural and functional imaging of the thoracolumbar spinal cord for applications in multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders

• Studies of sex differences in imaging biomarkers of neurological disease pathology


Position: Postdoctoral research fellow. Stipends vary depending on experience, and fringe benefits include payment of health insurance.


Candidate requirements: We seek qualified, motivated PhD science graduates (US citizens or permanent residents for NIBIB T32-funded position) from any discipline including physics, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, computer science, or a biological science. Strong candidates will be able to demonstrate their commitment to peer-reviewed research and effective communication through evidence of publications, presentations at scientific meetings, and prior grant funding or writing experience. Candidates should be interested in applying biomedical imaging to study diseases of the central nervous system.


Research Environment: VUIIS offers superb facilities with state of the art, high field human MRI scanners and an internationally-recognized faculty to enable trainees to become experts in modern MR technologies and applications. Surrounding Environment: The Vanderbilt School of Medicine’s biomedical research program is among the nation’s top 20 in terms of National Institutes of Health funding, receiving more than $700 million in public and private awards in 2020, including over 500 NIH awards totaling over $350 million. VUMC has over 2700 full-time faculty and is ranked among the top medical schools for research in the United States (#13 in 2022). Vanderbilt’s commitment to postdocs and early career trainees is award-winning. Key resources include the Office of Biomedical Research & Training (BRET), NIH- K and R01 workshops through the EdgeForScholars.org program, and alliance with HBCU Meharry Medical College. Finally, Vanderbilt is located in Nashville, TN; Nashville has been named America’s friendliest city multiple years in a row, is one of the 15 best cities for work and family (Fortune magazine), and is among 25 cities most likely to have the country's highest job growth over the coming five years (Forbes magazine). https://www.vumc.org/diversity/about-nashville


Vanderbilt University Medical Center is committed to the acceptance of a diverse group of trainees that is populated with trainees of all races, ethnicities, genders, gender identities, sexual orientation, disabilities, all places of geographic origin and the full spectrum of socio-economic status.


Application Instructions: Please send a CV, summary of research interests, and contact information for 2 references to Kristin O’Grady, PhD (kristin.p.ogrady@vumc.org).